Patrick

 

Chicago stage credits include work with Ulysses Theatre, Bailiwick, and Timeline Theatre. Favorite roles include Mitchell Garabedian, in Sin: A Cardinal Deposed (original Chicago and Boston casts); Judas in Corpus Christi (Jeff Citation & After Dark Award: Ensemble); Frank O’Hara in the premiere of Too Live As Variously As Possible; and Felix Turner in The Normal Heart (After Dark Award: Performance). He appeared in the short film Telling Dad and directed the premiere of Katrina: State of Emergency. Patrick was a co-founding member of Ulysses Theatre Company and is the Managing Director of Strawdog Theatre Company.

Full Birth Name: Patrick James Rybarczyk (confirmation name: Michael)

Hometown: Toledo, OH

Age you became interested in theatre: 17, Senior year of high school (if you don’t count those awesome grade school plays)

Favorite show you worked on: Corpus Christi

Most memorable moment while working on a show: The standing ovation that we got on opening night of The Normal Heart from a group of older gay men, who thanked us after the show for telling their story.

Mentors or inspirations: My friend, Sean Hayes

On a show day, how early do you arrive at the theatre: Call time

Dressing room must-have: Starbucks coffee

A show and role you would like to do: “Man in Chair” (aka the Narrator) in The Drowsy Chaperone

If you were in NY for 4 hours what show would you see: Once

Favorite food: mashed potatoes

If you could meet a Broadway legend, living or dead, who would you meet: Elaine Stritch – you know she has some great stories

Worst costume: Probably some bad tights while doing Shakespeare

First stage kiss: senior year of college during The Playboy of the Western World (yes, I was the Playboy)

One lesson you have learned while working in the theatre: Even more than ever, to trust my gut on and off stage

Most unplanned moment or funniest unscripted moment that happened to you while onstage: During The Music Man, end of act one we’re all singing The Wells Fargo Wagon, and a loud “whoosh” happens. It turns out that someone accidentally opened the fire door at the top of stage. Did I mention it was raining outside? Let’s just say we had REAL trouble in River City. Thank goodness it was almost intermission.

Pre-show ritual:  No rituals for me. I sort of just change things up show to show.

One piece of advice for those who are aspiring to work in the theatre: If you love it, stick with it.

I would like to congratulate my director and fellow castmate for their Broadway World Chicago awards.

winner

Our director John Nasca, who is also costuming our show, won Best Costume Design (Resident Non-Equity) for his work on Reefer Madness at Circle Theatre.

Michelle McKenzie-Voigt won Best Actress in a Play (Resident Non-Equity) for her performance as Sissy in Sordid Lives at Ludicrous Theatre Company.

Tonight Charlie and I will be performing a scene from Beautiful Thing at a Christmas party – stay tuned for video and photos. Until then, have a Beautiful Day!

photo

Michelle McKenzie-Voigt has professional credits ranging from Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet) to camp (Poseidon: An Upside-Down Musical). Recent favorites include The Christmas Miracle of Jonathan Toomey, Jesus Camp, Company, The Spitfire Grill, Cabaret, and Sordid Lives, for which she has been nominated for a 2012 Broadway World Chicago Award as Best Actress in a Play (Resident Non-Equity). She is honored to have worked with such theaters as Profiles, Provision, Organic, ITC, BrightSide, Cornservatory, Ludicrous, and Handbag, among others. A professional singer and voice talent, she is a Northwestern University graduate, four-time Chicago Emmy Award-nominee, and a proud company member of both PFP and Glitterati Productions.

Full Birth Name: Michelle Marie McKenzie-Voigt

Hometown: Evanston

Age you became interested in theatre:  I don’t remember a time – even as a child – when I wasn’t interested in performing.

Favorite show you worked on: Gypsy

Most memorable moment while working on a show: Every show has its own special memories, but in general, the moment just before I begin a big (solo) number is my favorite.  I feel as though I’m giving the audience a gift that’s just about to be unwrapped.

Mentors or inspirations:  My first mentor was my high school drama teacher, Frank Robins.  He’s no longer with us, but his support and encouragement were pivotal, to say the least.  After that, I’d have to say Tony Mockus, who got me my first Equity job, and John Nasca, who changed my life by giving me the role of a lifetime.

On a show day, how early do you arrive at the theatre:  I typically arrive at least 1 hour before curtain, but depending on the role, I may get there 2 hours early.

Dressing room must-have:  My script and, if it’s summertime, an electric fan!

A show and role you would like to do:  Non-musical: Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?  Musical: I’d love to reprise Rose in Gypsy

If you were in NY for 4 hours what show would you see:  The Book of Mormon or anything John Nasca considers a “must-see”

The best part of waking up is: Folgers in your cup.  No, seriously, when I’ve been able to sleep soundly for 9 hours!

If you could change your first name, what would you change it to: I’ve always loved the name “Michelle” and would never change it.  But I do like the name “Katherine” – if I’d had a daughter, I would have named her that.

Favorite food:  Warm chocolate cake with a glass of ice-cold skim milk, preferably eaten in bed.

Worst costume:  I was dressed as a chicken for a dinner theater musical revue

First stage kiss: My first stage kiss was also my first kiss in real life!  I was 15 and rehearsing a scene from William Gibson’s wonderful play Dinny and the Witches.  All my friends knew I had not yet been kissed and they congregated en masse in the auditorium to watch the first rehearsal of that pivotal scene!

One lesson you have learned while working in the theatre:  Patience.

Most unplanned moment or funniest unscripted moment that happened to you while onstage:  This was by no means funny, but it was certainly unplanned.  During Gypsy, I was about to launch into “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” when one of my bracelets broke, scattering dozens of tiny round beads directly in my path.  The director  held his breath – he had visions of me slipping on the beads, which were everywhere, and crashing to the floor.  Fortunately, that did not happen!

Pre-show ritual:  I don’t have one.  I do like to review the notes the director has given me throughout the rehearsal process, but I wouldn’t call it a ritual.

Biggest pet peeve: Knowing when the show is going to be videotaped.

One piece of advice for those who are aspiring to work in the theatre:

1)   Believe in yourself.  If you don’t, no one else will. 

2)   Always ALWAYS be polite to everyone.

3)   DON’T COMPLAIN.

4)   Take classes; it’s important to keep learning and growing. 

5)   Read plays and go to see theater.

(I guess that’s more than one, isn’t it?)

ste

Charlie recently moved to Chicago after completing his BA in Acting at Point Park University in Pittsburgh, and is delighted to making his Chicago debut as Ste in Beautiful Thing. Previous stage credits include Peter in The Diary of Anne Frank, Randy Anderson in The Outsiders, Lonnie in A Dead Man’s Apartment, Wendel P. Bloyd in Spoon River, and Dante in the Pittsburgh premiere of Off-Color Remarks for which he won an award for best supporting actor.  Film credits include Warrior, All in a Nights Work, The Dark Knight Rises.

Full Birth Name: Charles Nathan Wein

Hometown: Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

Age you became interested in theatre: Young enough that I can’t remember

Favorite show you worked on: Toyer by Gardner McKay

Most memorable moment while working on a show: My pants ripping at the end of Diary of Anne Frank.  I had to hold my pants up desperately while the Nazi’s were invading

Mentors or inspirations: Too many to list really, Cillian Murphy is my favorite actor, I aspire to be as versatile an actor as he is.

On a show day, how early do you arrive at the theatre: About 45 minutes to an Hour

Dressing room must-have: Ipod, need to be very much in my head before a show.

A show and role you would like to do: Reverend Hale in The Crucible is a dream role of mine. I’d kill to play Sam in Richard Nash’s Echoes someday too.

If you were in NY for 4 hours what show would you see: I have a couple friends on Broadway who’s shows I’d love to see

The best part of waking up is: Folgers in your cup

If you could change your first name, what would you change it to: I like my name, but I always thought Rasputin would be a cool name to explain to people

Favorite food: Chicken Pot Pie

If you could meet a Broadway legend, living or dead, who would you meet: I don’t know if he counts as a Broadway legend but I plan on meeting Mel Brooks whether he’s alive or dead.

Worst costume: My see through purple leotard for Seussical

First stage kiss: Anne Frank

One lesson you have learned while working in the theatre: “Just take the coaching”

Most unplanned moment or funniest unscripted moment that happened to you while onstage: During our rumble in The Outsiders I was supposed to have my head slammed on a bench before I punch the guy in the groin and crawl off stage.  One day he actually slammed my head on the bench. The Audience loved it.

Pre-show ritual:  That’s private!

Biggest pet peeve: People who say “I could care less” when they mean “I couldn’t care less”

One piece of advice for those who are aspiring to work in the theatre: Stop aspiring and just start doing it!

leahKiah is a sophomore drama major at Lincoln Park High school, and is ecstatic about being able to be a part of Beautiful Thing. Her previous stage work includes, Pirelli in Sweeney Todd, Dorothy in The Wiz, Helena in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Rosie in Bye Bye Birdie. Most recent film credits, “Yellow Snow Cones” and “Blink”.

Full Birth Name: Kiah Gardner McKirnan

Hometown: Chicago, IL

Age you became interested in theatre: 11-12

Favorite show you worked on: Ragtime, Sweeney Todd

Mentors or inspirations: Johnny Depp is such a malleable actor. I really aspire to be someone who can conform to a part so well and make it appear so effortless.

On a show day, how early do you arrive at the theatre: Either right at call time or a little before. I want to be available, but I don’t want to get in the way.

Dressing room must-have: Power foods; almonds, water bottles, protein bars… and sour patch watermelons.

A show and role you would like to do: Realistically, Mimi in Rent. Unrealistically, Cosette in Les Miserables.

If you were in NY for 4 hours what show would you see: Oh gosh. Lion King for the spectacle, Newsies and Mary Poppins for the fun and The Book of Mormon for the laughs.

The best part of waking up is: Smelling the eggs and bakey.

If you could change your first name, what would you change it to: Anastasia is my cousins name, and the nicknames are endless. And they aren’t ridiculous like, “Ki” (k-eye) or “Ah” (uh).

Favorite food: Mexican, Greek, Asian. Anything from the above three.

If you could meet a Broadway legend, living or dead, who would you meet: Heather Headly!!!

Worst costume: I was in a staged production of Narina. The costume consitited of styrofome horns clipped to me=y head and a wool overcoat. Which in turn, all fell of during a rousing rendition of, “Turkish, Turkish, Delight”.

First stage kiss: Have not actually had one yet! Any takers? ;)

One lesson you have learned while working in the theatre: Never try to direct your scene partner or ensemble members around the stage. It is entirely the director’s job to do this. I have learned the hard way, and I also hate it when it happens to me.

Most unplanned moment or funniest unscripted moment that happened to you while onstage: During a production of Annie that I was in, an orphan became a little frightened and peed on the stage. During, “It’s a Hard Knock Life”. We all kind of mistook the pee for the water coming from the mop buckets…. I guess more disgusting then funny now that I think about it.

Pre-show ritual:  I imagine that I am watching myself in the audience. If I can somehow “fool” myself and really envision me watching “Leah”, or whatever character, I know I’m doing a good job

*Biggest pet peeve: When people lock their car doors after you’ve gotten in. I guess they think I at some point during the journey I will throw myself from the moving vehicle?

One piece of advice for those who are aspiring to work in the theatre: Work for yourself. Be your own advocator and be your own agent. You know what you are good at, and you know what will work for you. You cannot just sit around and wait for the “big break” to come to you. Get out there, be heard, be seen, and be great.

One of the many things that has made this rehearsal process so wonderful for me is working with a group people who are funny, smart, witty, and unbelievably talented.

I talk about my castmates all the time, but I failed to do a proper introduction. So I asked each of them to fill out a short Q & A to help you get to know them a little better. Each day next week, I will post the answers from a different cast member, leading to my personal answers on Friday. First up on Monday you’ll hear from Kiah McKirnan, who plays the role of Leah.

Below are the questions I sent to my castmates. I would love to hear your answers to these questions, too! Please leave your answers in the comments section below. And if you have any questions you want to ask my castmates, director, or me, please write me at Beautifulthingchicago20@gmail.com

Until next time, have a Beautiful day!

 

Full Birth Name:

Hometown:

Age you became interested in theatre:

Favorite show you worked on:

Most memorable moment while working on a show:

Mentors or inspirations:

On a show day, how early do you arrive at the theatre:

Dressing room must-have:

A show and role you would like to do:

If you were in NY for 4 hours what show would you see:

The best part of waking up is:

If you could change your first name, what would you change it to:

Favorite food:

If you could meet a Broadway legend, living or dead, who would you meet:

Worst costume:

First stage kiss:

One lesson you have learned while working in the theatre:

Most unplanned moment or funniest unscripted moment that happened to you while onstage:

Pre-show ritual: 

Biggest pet peeve:

One piece of advice for those who are aspiring to work in the theatre: